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Environmental Law Centre on the Syncrude duck death trial

If you've been following the Syncrude duck death trial, check out this post by the Environmental Law Centre's Adam Driedzic. In it he answers common questions about the trial, and helps to clarify the implications of the pending verdict.

The prosecution has delivered its closing arguments in the case of R. v. Syncrude.  Syncrude’s non-suit application was dismissed, and it will be forced to plead a defence against evidence that could see it convicted.   The public interest this case has generated is warranted, but after two months of tar and feathers it can be hard to distinguish political debate about the oil sands from the actual legal issues.

Muddy Water II: Syncrude Ducks The Issue Read more about Environmental Law Centre on the Syncrude duck death trial

Media Release

Recall of Grizzly Recovery Team: Cause for Optimism or Just More Hot Air?

A temporary recall of Alberta’s Grizzly Bear Recovery Team could be the long-awaited first step on the road to recovery for the province’s beleaguered grizzlies, or could alternatively be nothing more than a public relations exercise. Read more about Recall of Grizzly Recovery Team: Cause for Optimism or Just More Hot Air?

Media Release

Alberta FOIP finds more than ducks killed on tar sands operations

Edmonton — An information request has forced the Alberta government to reveal that in addition to the infamous dead ducks, 164 animals, including 27 bears, were killed between 2000 and 2008 on operations in the Alberta tar sands.

The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy (FOIP) request was filed by independent scientist Kevin Timoney and sought material from Alberta Sustainable Resource Development (SRD). The disclosed SRD information covers only three oil companies and shows reported deaths of 27 black bears, 67 deer, 31 red fox, 21 coyote, as well as moose, muskrats, beavers, voles, martens, wolves, and bats. Read more about Alberta FOIP finds more than ducks killed on tar sands operations

Media Release

Humans Killing Too Many Grizzlies in Alberta

Human caused deaths of grizzly bears in Alberta reached unsustainable levels in 2009. Alberta Sustainable Resource Development (SRD) reported that 17 grizzly bears were killed by humans in 2009 and almost that many again were relocated.

Human caused deaths of grizzly bears in Alberta reached unsustainable levels in 2009. Alberta Sustainable Resource Development (SRD) reported that 17 grizzly bears were killed by humans in 2009 and almost that many again were relocated. Scientific research indicates that unknown poaching kills likely accounted for an additional five to eight undocumented grizzly bear mortalities. Conservationists are calling on the Alberta government to immediately list the grizzly bear as Threatened under Alberta’s Wildlife Act; increase habitat security by protecting critical habitat and reducing open route densities in grizzly bear range; and increase funding to public education programs that aim to reduce human-bear conflict.  Read more about Humans Killing Too Many Grizzlies in Alberta

Media Release

Grizzly Bear Hunt Suspended for Another Year in Alberta

The Alberta government’s recent decision to suspend the province’s grizzly bear hunt for 2010 is good news for the bears. With a current population estimate of 691 bears in Alberta, the species requires legal protection from harm, not deliberate killing, say Alberta’s conservation organizations.

“We applaud the Minister for continuing the government’s commitment to removing one avoidable cause of grizzly bear deaths,” says Nigel Douglas, Alberta Wilderness Association conservation specialist. “It is important that that the new minister for Sustainable Resource Development has reaffirmed the commitments of his predecessor.” Read more about Grizzly Bear Hunt Suspended for Another Year in Alberta

Media Release

Bighorn Wildland Protection Calls Bolstered by New Grizzly Report

Calls to protect one of Alberta’s last great unprotected watersheds received a recent boost with the publishing of the province’s new report, Status of the Grizzly Bear in Alberta. The 4,000 square kilometre Bighorn area, which sits east of Jasper and Banff National Parks, has suffered from motorized abuse, and it is now clear that grizzly bears are one more victim of that abuse. Read more about Bighorn Wildland Protection Calls Bolstered by New Grizzly Report

Media Release

Athabasca River at Risk

Despite good progress by a multi-stakeholder group in understanding issues around Athabasca River water withdrawals, Alberta Wilderness Association (AWA) is concerned there will still not be protective water rules for low winter flows. AWA believes oilsands mine river withdrawals must cease during low winter flows. Read more about Athabasca River at Risk

Media Release

Groups Seek Emergency Order to Stop Caribou Extirpation in Alberta Oilsands and Foothills

Alberta conservation groups are seeking an emergency order from Jim Prentice, Federal Environment Minister to enforce habitat protection for the endangered Foothills and Oil Sands woodland caribou herds. “Minister Prentice has recently acknowledged that there is a need for industry and the Alberta government to work with Ottawa to improve Canada’s environmental reputation. Alberta’s caribou desperately need Federal help, and this is Prentice’s chance to take meaningful action,” says Rocky Notnes with the Athabasca Bioregional Society. Read more about Groups Seek Emergency Order to Stop Caribou Extirpation in Alberta Oilsands and Foothills

Event

AWA Tuesday Talk: Do You Brake for Rattlesnakes?

Mar 10 2010 - 2:00am

Particularly susceptible to being killed by traffic on roads, the prairie rattlesnake (Crotalus v. viridis) is designated as a species that "may be at risk" by Alberta Sustainable Development.  The Alberta Endangered Species Conservation Committee has legally designated this animal as "data deficient".  Adam Martinson will present the results of his research investigating their spatial behaviour and patterns of road mortality risk.  It is hoped that the results of his and others' research can be used to lessen the impacts roads are having on Southern Albert Read more about AWA Tuesday Talk: Do You Brake for Rattlesnakes? a

Location

AWA Office
455 12 Street NW
Calgary , AB

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