Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

Story

CPAWS answers questions about the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement

Recently, eight conservation groups, including AEN member groups CPAWS and Greenpeace, signed one of the largest conservation agreements in the world with the Canadian forest industry. Aran O'Carroll, who neogtiated on behalf of CPAWS, answers some questions about the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement.

Read more about CPAWS answers questions about the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement

Media Release

New Report Shows the Province is Not Doing Enough to Protect and Recover Alberta’s Threatened Grizzly Bears

The Alberta government is not following its own recovery plan to protect the province’s grizzly bear population, which will likely lead to population decline

A new report analyzing current recovery efforts in Alberta indicates that the provincial government is not doing enough to protect one of the most threatened grizzly bear populations in North America. Recent research indicates that the grizzly bear population in Alberta is small and may be declining due to expanding networks of industrial access roads and the high levels of human-caused mortality that accompany them.

Read more about New Report Shows the Province is Not Doing Enough to Protect and Recover Alberta’s Threatened Grizzly Bears>
Story

Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement

Eight conservation groups, including AEN members CPAWS and Greenpeace, and the Canadian forest industry have signed off on one of the largest conservation agreements in the world. The Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement covers 72 million hectares of publically owned forests — an area twice the size of Germany.

Read more about Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement

Media Release

Recall of Grizzly Recovery Team: Cause for Optimism or Just More Hot Air?

A temporary recall of Alberta’s Grizzly Bear Recovery Team could be the long-awaited first step on the road to recovery for the province’s beleaguered grizzlies, or could alternatively be nothing more than a public relations exercise. Read more about Recall of Grizzly Recovery Team: Cause for Optimism or Just More Hot Air?

Media Release

Humans Killing Too Many Grizzlies in Alberta

Human caused deaths of grizzly bears in Alberta reached unsustainable levels in 2009. Alberta Sustainable Resource Development (SRD) reported that 17 grizzly bears were killed by humans in 2009 and almost that many again were relocated.

Human caused deaths of grizzly bears in Alberta reached unsustainable levels in 2009. Alberta Sustainable Resource Development (SRD) reported that 17 grizzly bears were killed by humans in 2009 and almost that many again were relocated. Scientific research indicates that unknown poaching kills likely accounted for an additional five to eight undocumented grizzly bear mortalities. Conservationists are calling on the Alberta government to immediately list the grizzly bear as Threatened under Alberta’s Wildlife Act; increase habitat security by protecting critical habitat and reducing open route densities in grizzly bear range; and increase funding to public education programs that aim to reduce human-bear conflict.  Read more about Humans Killing Too Many Grizzlies in Alberta

Event

CPAWS Fundraiser: Spin Around the Clock!

Apr 3 2010 (All day) to Apr 4 2010 (All day)

Work off those chocolate bunny calories ahead of time, while supporting CPAWS!

CPAWS Northern Alberta is assembling a team of people to participate in the Livia Stoyke Foundation's 24-hour Spin fundraiser. The Foundation provides vital support to a variety of causes (women, children, poverty relief, the arts and the environment) and to organizations like CPAWS.

What 's involved?

Sign up to a cycling shift on the CPAWS bike (for any number of hours), and commit to obtaining at least $20 in pledges (CPAWS will subsidize $30 of the $50 registration fee).  During the event at West Edmonton Mall, you can check out an array of bands and performers, cycle your shift, enjoy tasty food, and enter into a draw for cool prizes - like a 1 week rental of a deluxe houseboat. 

Read more about CPAWS Fundraiser: Spin Around the Clock!>

Location

The Ice Palace
West Edmonton Mall
Edmonton , AB
Media Release

Alberta Must Protect Half of Oil Sands Region

Conservation group warns species faces extinction unless government acts

Edmonton, Alberta — Alberta must act fast to protect 50% of the oil sands area from industrial use so that wilderness, biodiversity and traditional use can continue into the future.

That is the key advice contained in an open letter to Ed Stelmach from the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS). CPAWS wrote the letter to the premier on the occasion of World Wetlands Day, February 2, and the International Year of Biodiversity.

The province and energy industry have been criticized by leading thinkers and governments for their rush to extract fuel from the oil sands without regard for the environmental costs. Alberta has a chance to prove the critics wrong, says Helene Walsh, Boreal Conservation Director for CPAWS, Northern Alberta Read more about Alberta Must Protect Half of Oil Sands Region

Funding Opportunity

Call for Nominations for the J.B. Harkin Conservation Award 2010

Deadline: 
1 Mar 2010

Know someone who has made a significant contribution to conservation over their lifetime? Someone whose achievement is worthy of recognition?

We want to know about them!

About the J. B. Harkin Award

The J.B. Harkin Medal is Canada's most prestigious conservation award. Since 1972, the award has been presented by CPAWS to living individuals who:

  • have made a significant life-long contribution through words and deeds to the conservation of Canada's parks and wilderness;
  • or have made a special one-time contribution to national conservation;
  • and have not been otherwise recognized.

The award is named for James Bernard Harkin, Canada's 1st Commissioner of National Parks. Learn more about the J.B. Harkin Medal and see a list of previous participants at the CPAWS website. Read more about Call for Nominations for the J.B. Harkin Conservation Award 2010

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