About the AEN

The Alberta Environmental Network (AEN) connects Albertans and environmental groups that are dedicated to preserving and protecting Alberta’s environment. As a non-profit and non-partisan organization, the AEN supports collaboration of the environmental community throughout the province.

Learn more about the Alberta Environmental Network.

Connecting Alberta’s environmental groups

We are a network of individuals and groups working together on shared concerns. AEN members include individuals and representatives from member groups that connect, collaborate and share information.

The AEN is a link between the environmental community and government, industry, the media and all Albertans. View our current member groups.

Join the network

Albertans and environmental groups are welcome to join the AEN as members – there are memberships for both individuals and groups. Members contribute to preserving and protecting Alberta’s environment by sharing information and collaborating on shared issues. Learn more about becoming a member of the AEN.

The AEN supports an inclusive and diverse environmental community for all Albertans. 

Alberta Government Fails Our Grizzly Bears Again

Alberta Wilderness
Association

News Release: February 2, 2005

The Alberta government yesterday announced that it will go ahead with this
year's spring grizzly bear hunt, despite overwhelming scientific evidence
that Alberta's grizzlies are in serious trouble. Alberta Wilderness
Association (AWA) is one of a number of environmental organisations in
agreement with government scientists and committees who have consistently
recommended suspending the hunt.

"Scientists now agree that Alberta's grizzly bear population stands at
less than 700 bears," says AWA Conservation Specialist, Nigel Douglas. "The
government's own Grizzly Bear Recovery Team has called for a postponement to
the hunt. Its Endangered Species Conservation Committee has recommended
listing the grizzly as a "threatened" species which would lead to an
automatic suspension of the hunt. To continue to kill threatened grizzly
bears is obtuse in the extreme." Read more about Alberta Government Fails Our Grizzly Bears Again

ERSC Environmental News Volume 5 Issue 1 Now Online

Visit http://www.ualberta.ca/ERSC/news.htm
to read articles written by Graduate Students about their Environmental
Research.

Articles include:

  • Polar Bears: Walking on thin ice, by Emily Parks
  • What do we really know about tree competition?, by Erin Fraser
  • Studying Species using Faeces: Non-invasive wolf research in the
    Canadian Rockies, by Conrad Thiessen
  • Brown trees in green-tree retention, by Kevin Bladon

Comments, suggestions may be sent to [email protected] Read more about ERSC Environmental News Volume 5 Issue 1 Now Online

New Publication - Enforcing Environmental Law: A Guide to Private Prosecution

Enforcing Environmental Law: A Guide to Private Prosecution, Second
Edition
By James S. Mallet

December, 2004

ISBN 0-921503-78-4

$34.95 + GST

Canadian law allows any citizen to lay charges against a polluter or other
environmental offender where there is evidence of an offence. Enforcing
Environmental Law: A Guide to Private Prosecution, 2nd edition will help
readers determine when private prosecution is the right tool to address
environmental harm, and provides a step-by-step guide to the process, from
laying charges through trial and appeal. In some cases Alternative tools are
more effective, and these are explained. The book also provides guidance on
building a case and finding assistance, and includes a proposal for law and
policy reform. Read more about New Publication - Enforcing Environmental Law: A Guide to Private Prosecution

Help Suspend This Year's Grizzly Bear Hunt

Alberta Wilderness Association

In the next few days, David Coutts, the new Minister for
Sustainable Resource Development (SRD), will decide
whether to continue with Alberta's spring grizzly bear
hunt this year. AWA is optimistic that, if the Minister
hears from enough people now, he will act to suspend
the grizzly hunt, as recommended by government
scientists for the past three years.

Background

In recent years, the evidence has become more and
more solid that Alberta's grizzly bear population is not
healthy enough to support a hunt. In 2002, the Read more about Help Suspend This Year's Grizzly Bear Hunt

Optimism That New Minister Will End Grizzly Bear Hunt

Alberta Wilderness Association

News Release: January 20, 2005

Environmental groups are optimistic that a change in
Minister will lead to a long-awaited suspension of the
spring grizzly bear hunt in Alberta. Alberta Wilderness
Association (AWA) has consistently argued that
Alberta's grizzly population is not large enough to
support hunting. We are calling for the new Minister of
Sustainable Resource Development (SRD), David
Coutts, to listen to the recommendations of his own
scientists, and to suspend the hunt.

"Minister Coutts is expected to announce in the next few Read more about Optimism That New Minister Will End Grizzly Bear Hunt

Cheviot Hearing in Hinton

The Alberta Environmental Appeals Board (EAB) will finally hold its hearing
to listen to Ben Gadd’s appeal of the approvals issued by Alberta
Environment in December 2003 for the Cheviot haulroad development located
adjacent to Jasper National Park. Substantial new information will come
forward at the hearing as this type of development was initially rejected
by the companies and hence, was not considered in the previous reviews of
the Cheviot mine application.

When
January 24 – 25, 2005
8:00 am to 6:00 pm each day

Where
Hinton, Alberta Read more about Cheviot Hearing in Hinton

Where's the label? Absence of mandatory GE labelling in Canada equates to involuntary human experiment

Biofreedom

What do Haagen-Dazs ice cream, Miracle Whip dressing, and Nabisco wheat thins have in common? According to the Greenpeace Shopper's Guide "How to Avoid Genetically Engineered (GE) Food" (www.greenpeace.ca/shoppersguide), these products and many others are "likely to contain GE or GE-derived ingredients from the most widely grown GE crops, usually corn, soy, canola or cotton."

Since there are no mandatory GE labelling regulations in Canada, consumers cannot really know whether the products they buy contain GE ingredients. Why is it that over 35 other countries require mandatory labelling of GE food, but Canada does not? Yet polls have consistently shown that Canadians want mandatory labelling. This has to change. Biofreedom, a small non-profit group based in Edmonton, is starting a labelling campaign in 2005 and we need your help. Read more about Where's the label? Absence of mandatory GE labelling in Canada equates to involuntary human experiment

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