About the AEN

The Alberta Environmental Network (AEN) connects Albertans and environmental groups that are dedicated to preserving and protecting Alberta’s environment. As a non-profit and non-partisan organization, the AEN supports collaboration of the environmental community throughout the province.

Learn more about the Alberta Environmental Network.

Connecting Alberta’s environmental groups

We are a network of individuals and groups working together on shared concerns. AEN members include individuals and representatives from member groups that connect, collaborate and share information.

The AEN is a link between the environmental community and government, industry, the media and all Albertans. View our current member groups.

Join the network

Albertans and environmental groups are welcome to join the AEN as members – there are memberships for both individuals and groups. Members contribute to preserving and protecting Alberta’s environment by sharing information and collaborating on shared issues. Learn more about becoming a member of the AEN.

The AEN supports an inclusive and diverse environmental community for all Albertans. 

Youth Volunteer Opportunity: The Canadian Wilderness Stewardship Program

Position: 
Canadian Wilderness Stewardship Program
Application Deadline: 
7 Aug 2020
Location: 
Southern Alberta

Empowering Youth to Be Leaders in Conservation

The Canadian Wilderness Stewardship Program (CWSP) is an educational experience designed to inspire the next generation of environmental stewards in Canada by connecting youth to nature and their local communities. Participants of the 2019-2020 program hailed from New Brunswick, the National Capital Region, Northern Manitoba, and Nunavut. 

The three core components of the program are: Read more about Youth Volunteer Opportunity: The Canadian Wilderness Stewardship Program

New Bill 22 proposes changes to series of environmental tools in the name of “red tape reduction”

Edmonton – A new bill was proposed by the provincial government on June 11, 2020, which takes aim at removing “red tape” to reduce costs, speed up approvals, and eliminate regulations the government deems unnecessary. The new Red Tape Reduction Implementation Act, 2020, was proposed by the provincial government on June 11, 2020. The omnibus bill includes 14 changes across six ministries that would affect land use activities within our protected parks, oil sands project approvals, and energy efficiency–among other concerning environmental issues. Read more about New Bill 22 proposes changes to series of environmental tools in the name of “red tape reduction”

Groups across Alberta and the Northwest Territories warn the federal government of impacts of monitoring suspensions on Wood Buffalo National Park

Edmonton – The following letter was submitted on behalf of a joint group including: Fort Chipewyan Métis Association, Northwest Territory Métis Nation, Smith’s Landing First Nation, the Hamlet of Fort Resolution, Keepers of the Athabasca Watershed Society Organization, Alberta Wilderness Association, CPAWS Northern Alberta, CPAWS Northwest Territories, Ecology North, Alternatives North, and Council of Canadians – Edmonton and Northwest Territories Chapters. The letter to the federal Minister of Environment and Climate Change outlines the substantial risks to downstream communities and ecosystems due to the Alberta Energy Regulator’s decision to suspend environmental monitoring for oil & gas projects. The health of Wood Buffalo National Park and the success of its federal Action Plan is undermined by these suspensions. Wood Buffalo National Park is Canada’s largest national park, and continued ecological degradation would be grounds to list as a World Heritage Site “in Danger”. 

Download the full letter on the CPAWS website Read more about Groups across Alberta and the Northwest Territories warn the federal government of impacts of monitoring suspensions on Wood Buffalo National Park

Job Opportunity: Executive Director, Yukon Conservation Society

Position: 
Executive Director
Application Deadline: 
3 Jul 2020
Location: 
Whitehorse

The Yukon Conservation Society (YCS) is seeking a highly motivated and experienced individual to lead our 50-year-old ENGO. The successful candidate will have experience working with First Nations and other levels of government, and communities. Ideally, this experience was gathered working North of 60. The candidate will need to have a strong advocacy for conservation. They will have a track record of successful staff and volunteer management, fund-raising experience, and knowledge of environmental issues, particularly those relevant to the Yukon. Read more about Job Opportunity: Executive Director, Yukon Conservation Society

New report on the intersection of the Polluter Pays Principle and insolvency laws

At the Environmental Law Centre blog, Jason Unger writes about the "polluter pays principle" and its intersection with the economic challenges Alberta faces resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic and low energy prices.

…it remains unclear how our society will uphold and promote the polluter pays principle, not only today and tomorrow but well into the future.

Read more about New report on the intersection of the Polluter Pays Principle and insolvency laws

Protecting Canada's Fresh Water

Initiative: 
Creation of a Canada Water Agency
Deadline: 
31 May 2021

From the Environment and Climate Change Canada website:

Share your ideas about current and future freshwater management challenges in Canada and the role a new Canada Water Agency could play in keeping our freshwater resources safe, clean and well-managed for generations to come.

How to participate

Visit our website

Share your ideas or comments by visiting our PlaceSpeak site.

Send us an email

Submit your comments by email to [email protected].

Consultation goal

The Government of Canada, through Environment and Climate Change Canada and support from Agriculture and Agri-food Canada, is seeking public input on freshwater challenges in Canada and how a Canada Water Agency can further protections for Canada’s freshwater resources.

Over the course of this consultation, we will be publishing discussion aids and posing specific questions on our PlaceSpeak site to find out what Canadians would like to see in this new Agency and how we can further protections for Canada’s most important resource.

Share your ideas or comments Read more about Protecting Canada's Fresh Water

Job Opportunity: Domestic Campaign & Community Coordinator, CAN-Rac

Position: 
Domestic Campaign & Community Coordinator
Application Deadline: 
10 Jun 2020
Location: 
Montréal
other locations will be considered

Contract Period: 1-year term. This is a full time (40 hours per week) position.
Salary Range: $53,000 – $56,000 plus remuneration (6%) in lieu of group benefits.

The Organization

Climate Action Network – Réseau action climat (CAN-Rac) Canada builds social consensus for bold climate action by nurturing a diverse network of over 100 passionate organizations. Canada’s primary network of organizations working on climate change and energy issues, CAN-Rac is a coalition of 115 organizations operating from coast to coast to coast. Our members include all major Canadian environmental organizations, local volunteer-run organizations focused on regional issues, and organizations of all sizes and scopes in between. While Climate Action Network nodes exist all over the world, Canada’s is unique in that it brings environmental NGOs together with trade unions, First Nations, social justice, development, health and youth organizations, faith groups and local, grassroots initiatives. For 31 years, CAN-Rac has been the only national organization with a mandate to promote the interests of the Canadian climate movement as a whole, rather than any one individual organization.

Job  Summary

Reporting to the Senior Leadership Team, the Domestic Campaign and Community Coordinator is responsible for strategic convening of CAN-Rac’s membership, with a particular emphasis on Francophone groups and communities, particularly from Quebec but not exclusively, in support of domestic policy development and supporting campaigns designed to bring Canada to its fair share of the global effort to confront climate change. We are seeking a candidate who is familiar with the landscape of the Canadian climate movement, in Québec and other French-speaking regions and across the rest of Canada, who can build strong, service-oriented relationships with our 115+ members. This role will require an ability to develop and implement multi-faceted campaigns, while clearly communicating strategies and activities within French-speaking communities to communities in English-speaking Canada and vice versa.

Full job description & application instructions Read more about Job Opportunity: Domestic Campaign & Community Coordinator, CAN-Rac

Rescinding the Alberta Coal Policy opens headwaters in the eastern slopes of the Rockies to open-pit coal mining

Calgary – The Government of Alberta has rescinded A Coal Development Policy for Alberta (1976; the Coal Policy). CPAWS Southern Alberta is concerned about the impacts this will have on Alberta’s treasured mountains and foothills along the eastern slopes of the Rockies. “There are currently no other land use plans or policies that directly replace the environmental zoning and restrictions under the Coal Policy” says Katie Morrison, Conservation Director for CPAWS Southern Alberta. “This leaves sensitive headwaters regions and treasured landscapes that provide habitat for species like grizzly bear, elk, and threatened native trout, at risk to the disturbances that come with surface coal mining and increased exploration.”

Since 1976, the Coal Policy has provided important land use zoning frameworks which have informed management and development of coal mines along the eastern slopes region of Alberta.

The Coal Policy’s Land Classification System prevented coal development on Category 1 lands and restricted development to underground or in-situ mining under Category 2 lands along the eastern slopes. The Coal Policy Category 2 covers 1,458,000 ha of the headwaters areas that provide the majority of drinking water to downstream communities in Alberta and across the prairies. With the removal of the coal policy, open-pit coal mines will now be permitted on these sensitive lands. Read more about Rescinding the Alberta Coal Policy opens headwaters in the eastern slopes of the Rockies to open-pit coal mining

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